they would speak a thousand things

Archive for December 9, 2010

On Being a Cutter (and Healing Prayer)

 

If there is a difference between who you are being and who God created you to be there will be conflict, and that conflict will cause pain.

People exist in 3 inseparable realms: the spiritual, emotional and physical, and pain can exist in or even inhabit one or more of those realms. Sometimes pain can’t be traced to one specific realm, because they are interrelated. But God heals the brokenness by restoring the girl to wholeness in all 3 realms. We are called to “carry one another’s burdens and so fulfill the law of Christ” in Galatians 6:2 and to “confess your sins to one another and pray for one another so that you may be healed” in James 5:16. This means there are 3 aspects needed for healing prayer. 1) the girl to confess her sins 2) the intercessor, or person to whom she confesses, and 3) the Holy Spirit who is irrevocably involved when a person prays. But the one catch is that the girl must listen and hear the truth in order to be healed. When God speaks the truth to her, it will transform her mind and allow her to understand her identity as God originally intended.

But challenges to our God-given identity will always occur as a result of faulty conclusions that we draw. These steps are: 1) I observe 2) I interpret 3) I conclude 4) I choose 5) I act 6) I am. A misinterpretation or a bad conclusion will cause an unwise choice. Your identity is formed by the things you believe and the actions you take as a result. Maybe you think I am a cutter (identity) because I cut myself (actions) and rely on it (choice) to fill some need (conclusion). But that is not my identity. Sometimes I think it is. But being a “cutter” to the core is not who God created me to be. It causes me pain to be labeled as a cutter, because it does not line up with who God created me to be. The only way to change this is to change the conclusion (that I am a cutter) you make as a result of your interpretation (because I cut myself) from the observation you first made (seeing my scars).

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